NEWHAVEN — A  UNIQUE FISHING VILLAGE ON THE COAST OF THE FORTH, PROUD OF ITS TRADITIONS, CULTURE AND HISTORY

newhaven-on-forth

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Supported by Newhaven Action Group which is recognised as a Scottish registered charity: OSCR Number: SC042050

If you have contributions to make to the knowledge base and photographic archives on any of the topics on this page, they would be most welcome.


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Pubs, Inns and Hotels

At one time, the small village of 2000 people boasted (if that’s the correct word) seventeen pubs, inns and hotels. This was largely due to Newhaven being a popular ferry port for services to Burntisland, Kirkcaldy and Stirling.  Also fishermen from numerous east coast ports would land their catch to be sold to the fishwives for resale and then fortify themselves for the return journey.


Newhaveners too, of course, also made their regular contributions to the welfare of the publicans and innkeepers.


Even in the 1950s, without the benefit of ferries and a declining fish trade, there were nine hosteries.  Frank Ferri remembers. “Starting at the east end at Anchorfield and moving west, there was the Prom Bar, Annfield Bar, Peacock Inn, Bow-Tow (mock Tudor building now a house), the Drift looking into the square — a tiny wee pub. In the square, on left, was the Harbour Bar and opposite that was The Ship. At Andrew Wood Court was Maggie McFadyens, Barney Battles at Pier Place opposite the harbour (now a house).  Just beyond the former Leith Boating Club was Marine Hotel.


I must say the pubs in the village, then, all had atmosphere and most had a box player with a sing-along on weekends and not least of all the Peacock.”